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Back to school: children’s mental health referrals expected to soar after 8th March

Leading EdTech platform MyTutor reveal that levels of stress and anxiety in children have dramatically risen during the pandemic

Nearly 5 million British parents say that their child has the highest levels of stress they have observed in their lifetime  

  • 42% agree (4,730,000) that their child has the highest levels of stress they have observed in their lifetime  
  • 42% of parents (4,113,000) agree that their child has experienced high levels of anxiety due to the reduced class time for assessments that exam results will be gauged from 
  • 75% (8,069,000) say that their child has regular breaks throughout the day to alleviate the stress of home-schooling 
  • 42% (4,562,000) say that they have relaxed the pressures of home-schooling for their child considerably in comparison to previous lockdowns and school closures 
     

After a year of disruption to children’s education, with lockdown severely restricting access to usual learning facilities and social interactions, quality of education is not the only area that has suffered. Clinicians have warned that the mental health of children has seen a significant decline as a result of the pandemic, with mental health referrals now expected to soar once schools reopen next week on the 8th of March.

New data from leading EdTech platform MyTutor has revealed that nearly 5 million British parents say their child is displaying the highest levels of stress they have observed in their lifetime. Plus, over 4 million parents say that high levels of anxiety boils down to reduced class time for assessments that exam results will be gauged from. In an effort to combat such difficulties for children, parents have actively pursued to ease the burden of home-schooling, with 75% of children across the nation have regular breaks throughout the day to alleviate the stresses which come with remote learning. 

Homeschooling has not been easy to navigate for parents or children, but the implications of lockdown stretch beyond academics alone. It is thought that some children who may have been suffering from poor mental health during the past year will only be noticed once they return to the classroom.

Bertie Hubbard, co-founder of EdTech platform MyTutor, discusses the impact which the pandemic has had on the mental wellbeing of young people across the nation:

The last twelve monthshave been unbelievably tough year on teens and parents alike. After months out of school, exam cancellations, not seeing friends and worrying about Covid-19, it’s no surprise that 42% parents feel their child’s mental health is the worst it has ever been. 17% parents agree that their mental health is also the worst it’s ever been, with42% have noticing that in this lockdown, they’re less stringent with home-schooling than previous lockdowns.Once schools open again, catching up on lost learning and prepping for assessed workin the summer term will bring another set of challenges for teens.

They’re in more need than ever for some support and reassurance with their studies, and that’s exactly what our tutors offer. Our tutors are all from UK universities, and because they’re just a few years older they can easily relate to what teens are going through. With their dedicated one-to-one support, teens get some much-needed reassurance and come out with a stronger self-belief – 88% say that lessons made them feel more confident.”

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