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Oily Cart’s Doorstep Jamboree arrives in London

From 16 September, nominated families of young people with complex needs will enjoy a performance of music and spectacle on their own doorstep.

Each performance will be unique and responsive to the individual family, and those nominated and selected will be able to choose the performance activity based on their needs and preferences.

One option is that three members of the Jamboree band will improvise outside their house for an hour. Before the mini show, the musicians will post a bespoke sensory prop, so the young person and the band can ‘jam’ together through the window or letterbox.

Another option is a personalised zoom performance with a song dedicated to the young person. This is recorded and added to an album of songs from Jamboree that the family will be sent afterwards.

Doorstep Jamboree is the first project in Oily Cart’s ‘Uncancellable Programme, developed in response to the global health crisis. Over the next 18 months, the company will take work online, into homes and onto the streets to ensure they are serving their community throughout this difficulty time.

Doorstep Jamboree will take place at fifteen homes throughout London. There will be a ‘pop-up’ version that will visit children’s outdoor play centres and residential schools.

As part of this tour, Oily Cart will also be releasing a Jamboree Album.

Robyn Steward who is an original member of the Jamboree band and a disabled activist said:

“Many kids around the UK have not been able to go out at all, this group of children have really high support needs but are still human and have positive qualities, but when you don’t see people it’s easy to forget about them. It’s also vital that children who are not able to speak are listened to through their own means of communication.”

Ellie Griffiths Artistic Director of Oily Cart said:

“Based on many conversations with D/deaf, disabled and neurodivergent artists and families who are still shielding, we have developed a unique artistic programme in response to the unprecedented situation of Covid-19. Although this context throws up new challenges, requiring new ways of working, Oily Cart is used to ripping up the rule book of traditional theatre to take it to places it has never been. Our mission now is to amplify voices of young people who are non-verbal, so they become a part of the conversation as the ‘new normal’ is being built. Shielding should not affect anyone’s right to creativity, their right to connection and their right to play.”

The Doorstep Jamboree travelling band will be popping up across London on the doorsteps and streets of families with young people labelled as having complex needs who are still shielding because of Covid-19.

The band will play Balkan-inspired tunes from Oily Cart’s sensory gig Jamboree. A colourful and joyful celebration of resilience, the tour is also a protest and advocacy tool to make sure those shielding do not feel invisible.

Each performance will be unique and responsive to the individual family, and those nominated and selected will be able to choose the performance activity based on their needs and preferences.

One option is that three members of the Jamboree band will improvise outside their house for an hour. Before the mini show, the musicians will post a bespoke sensory prop, so the young person and the band can ‘jam’ together through the window or letterbox.

Another option is a personalised zoom performance with a song dedicated to the young person. This is recorded and added to an album of songs from Jamboree that the family will be sent afterwards.

Doorstep Jamboree is the first project in Oily Cart’s ‘Uncancellable Programme, developed in response to the global health crisis. Over the next 18 months, the company will take work online, into homes and onto the streets to ensure they are serving their community throughout this difficulty time.

Doorstep Jamboree will take place at fifteen homes throughout London. There will be a ‘pop-up’ version that will visit children’s outdoor play centres and residential schools.

As part of this tour, Oily Cart will also be releasing a Jamboree Album.

“Many kids around the UK have not been able to go out at all, this group of children have really high support needs but are still human and have positive qualities, but when you don’t see people it’s easy to forget about them. It’s also vital that children who are not able to speak are listened to through their own means of communication.”

Robyn Steward who is an original member of the Jamboree band and a disabled activist says.

“Based on many conversations with D/deaf, disabled and neurodivergent artists and families who are still shielding, we have developed a unique artistic programme in response to the unprecedented situation of Covid-19. Although this context throws up new challenges, requiring new ways of working, Oily Cart is used to ripping up the rule book of traditional theatre to take it to places it has never been. Our mission now is to amplify voices of young people who are non-verbal, so they become a part of the conversation as the ‘new normal’ is being built. Shielding should not affect anyone’s right to creativity, their right to connection and their right to play.”

Ellie Griffiths Artistic Director of Oily Cart said:
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